Britzer Muhle

Looking for the oldest windmill in Neukölln
The Britzer Muhle is one of the eight remaining windmills in Berlin, and it is the only surviving windmill that used to exist in Neukölln. Also, it’s the only remaining fully functional windmill in Berlin, and these are some of the many reasons why you need to visit this place.

I discovered the place entirely by accident when I was taking my bike for a long walk to Brandenburg. Once I was at Buckower Damm, I saw this weird shaped thing on the corner of my eye, and I had to stop my bike. That odd shape was the Britzer Muhle.

This was more than a couple years ago and, every so often, I cycle around the area and stop to enjoy the view of a fully functional windmill in the German capital. Something that doesn’t make that much sense to me, but it’s a sight that I love to see.

But, what is the story behind the Britzer Muhle?

The area where the Britzer Muhle stands today used to belong to master baker Friedrich Jentsch who bought the property in 1856. A few years later, it was sold to Heinrich Simon, who build a house, stables and a barn. In 1862, the property was sold again, this time to master baker Friedrich Wilhelm Schulz. In 1865 it was resold to timber trader Carl-Rudolf Wismar and, finally, in 1865, it went into the hands of master miller Johann Wilhelm Gottlob Dörfer.

After the property moving between owners for more than 10 years, Johann Wilhelm Gottlob Dörfer decided to build the Dutch windmill we can see today. The technology behind it was a combination of British and American, and, nowadays, the twelve-edged type with two grinding cycles is extremely rare when it comes to windmills.

The property changed owners a few more times during the years, and, in 1955, it came under preservation. The wings and gallery were restored, and the mill was covered in new wooden shingles. Something that was genuinely needed since Britzer Muhle was partially destroyer during the Allied Air Raids from 1943.

The Britzer Muhle is one of the eight remaining windmills in Berlin, and it is the only surviving windmill that used to exist in Neukölln. Also, it’s the only remaining fully functional windmill in Berlin, and these are some of the many reasons why you need to visit this place.
The Britzer Muhle is one of the eight remaining windmills in Berlin, and it is the only surviving windmill that used to exist in Neukölln. Also, it’s the only remaining fully functional windmill in Berlin, and these are some of the many reasons why you need to visit this place.
The Britzer Muhle is one of the eight remaining windmills in Berlin, and it is the only surviving windmill that used to exist in Neukölln. Also, it’s the only remaining fully functional windmill in Berlin, and these are some of the many reasons why you need to visit this place.
The Britzer Muhle is one of the eight remaining windmills in Berlin, and it is the only surviving windmill that used to exist in Neukölln. Also, it’s the only remaining fully functional windmill in Berlin, and these are some of the many reasons why you need to visit this place.
The Britzer Muhle is one of the eight remaining windmills in Berlin, and it is the only surviving windmill that used to exist in Neukölln. Also, it’s the only remaining fully functional windmill in Berlin, and these are some of the many reasons why you need to visit this place.
The Britzer Muhle is one of the eight remaining windmills in Berlin, and it is the only surviving windmill that used to exist in Neukölln. Also, it’s the only remaining fully functional windmill in Berlin, and these are some of the many reasons why you need to visit this place.

In 1959, the city of Berlin acquired the property, and it became part of the concept behind the 1985 Federal Garden Show that developed the gorgeous Britzer Gardens close by. It was only in February 1987 that the windmill was used again, after standing still for more than 50 bars. The first grains were pounded in the 121-year-old windmill, and, in the same year, the restaurant opened.

Today you can visit the Britzer Muhle, and there are tours of the windmill as well. The Britzer Muhle restaurant is open daily, and they offered bread that is made from the grains ground in the mill. So, if you are interested in the history of Neukölln and would like to explore it further, this is one of the best places for this.

The pictures that you can see here are from different visits to Britzer Muhle. Some of them date to 2014, some from 2018 and, the ones taken by drone, are from the Spring of 2020.

The Britzer Muhle is one of the eight remaining windmills in Berlin, and it is the only surviving windmill that used to exist in Neukölln. Also, it’s the only remaining fully functional windmill in Berlin, and these are some of the many reasons why you need to visit this place.
The Britzer Muhle is one of the eight remaining windmills in Berlin, and it is the only surviving windmill that used to exist in Neukölln. Also, it’s the only remaining fully functional windmill in Berlin, and these are some of the many reasons why you need to visit this place.
The Britzer Muhle is one of the eight remaining windmills in Berlin, and it is the only surviving windmill that used to exist in Neukölln. Also, it’s the only remaining fully functional windmill in Berlin, and these are some of the many reasons why you need to visit this place.
The Britzer Muhle is one of the eight remaining windmills in Berlin, and it is the only surviving windmill that used to exist in Neukölln. Also, it’s the only remaining fully functional windmill in Berlin, and these are some of the many reasons why you need to visit this place.
The Britzer Muhle is one of the eight remaining windmills in Berlin, and it is the only surviving windmill that used to exist in Neukölln. Also, it’s the only remaining fully functional windmill in Berlin, and these are some of the many reasons why you need to visit this place.

Britzer Muhle in Neukölln

Britzer Muhle – finding Windmills in Berlin-Neukölln

Buckower Damm 130, 12349 Berlin

www.britzer-muellerei.de





If you like what you read here, you should join us on our facebook group, Twitter and, maybe, even our Flipboard Magazine. Or, subscribe to our newsletter!

Comments

comments