A Visit to Vogelsang

Exploring an Abandoned Soviet Military Base north of Berlin
Vogelsang used to be more than just a Soviet military base. This place used to be a city filled with secrets and soldiers, but today it lays empty in Brandenburg while it rots away in the middle of a forest.

This is the place that a friend and we decided to spend a cold October morning back in 2016. We decided to use some remaining days off to go explore some abandoned places around Berlin. First, we went hunting for Lenin Statues in Fürstenberg. Then we took our cameras to Vogelsang after reading an article on Abandoned Berlin.

Arriving there early in the morning wasn’t a problem. We met in Südkreuz and carried our bikes to the district known as Zehdenick. You can take the regional train RB12 there and stop at the Vogelsang Bahnhof. You will be close enough to this former Soviet military base.

From the train station, we cycled through a Christmas tree forest and, after a hundred meters or so, we found the abandoned road that leads to the Vogelsang Kaserne.

But, before we talk a bit about what we saw there, we have to say something about the history of this place.

The area changed after the Second World War when it became of strategic importance to the Soviet Forces in Occupied Germany. Construction of the barracks and the military base started in 1952 and, after it was done, it housed up to 15.000 people. It was considered to be the third-largest Soviet based in East Germany. Only the complex in Wünsdorf was more significant.
The area changed after the Second World War when it became of strategic importance to the Soviet Forces in Occupied Germany. Construction of the barracks and the military base started in 1952 and, after it was done, it housed up to 15.000 people. It was considered to be the third-largest Soviet based in East Germany. Only the complex in Wünsdorf was more significant.
The area changed after the Second World War when it became of strategic importance to the Soviet Forces in Occupied Germany. Construction of the barracks and the military base started in 1952 and, after it was done, it housed up to 15.000 people. It was considered to be the third-largest Soviet based in East Germany. Only the complex in Wünsdorf was more significant.
The area changed after the Second World War when it became of strategic importance to the Soviet Forces in Occupied Germany. Construction of the barracks and the military base started in 1952 and, after it was done, it housed up to 15.000 people. It was considered to be the third-largest Soviet based in East Germany. Only the complex in Wünsdorf was more significant.
Vogelsang is an exciting place for those who, like us, like to explore abandoned places. We saw a lot of unusual things in there, and we can only hope they are there when you visit it. If you do, don't destroy anything, don't take something with you and leave it as it was. Just take pictures and enjoy the fact that you are walking inside a former military base of a country that doesn't exist anymore. This is a piece of history and should be seen as such.
Vogelsang is an exciting place for those who, like us, like to explore abandoned places. We saw a lot of unusual things in there, and we can only hope they are there when you visit it. If you do, don't destroy anything, don't take something with you and leave it as it was. Just take pictures and enjoy the fact that you are walking inside a former military base of a country that doesn't exist anymore. This is a piece of history and should be seen as such.

A short history lesson about the Soviet military base known as Vogelsang

Before the Second World War, Vogelsang was known for its people that worked and lived off of the forest. If we felt like the forest around the military was thick when we visited it in 2016, we can only imagine how gorgeous this would be in the past.

The area changed after the Second World War when it became of strategic importance to the Soviet Forces in Occupied Germany. Construction of the barracks and the military base started in 1952 and, after it was done, it housed up to 15.000 people. It was considered to be the third-largest Soviet based in East Germany. Only the complex in Wünsdorf was more significant.

This was a self-contained city for the military and their families, and it was entirely off-limits for non-essential personnel. It was so massive that it included a theatre, a school and gym, shops and medical facilities. Some of these places can still be visited today, but we know that they don’t look like they used to anymore.

The area changed after the Second World War when it became of strategic importance to the Soviet Forces in Occupied Germany. Construction of the barracks and the military base started in 1952 and, after it was done, it housed up to 15.000 people. It was considered to be the third-largest Soviet based in East Germany. Only the complex in Wünsdorf was more significant.
The area changed after the Second World War when it became of strategic importance to the Soviet Forces in Occupied Germany. Construction of the barracks and the military base started in 1952 and, after it was done, it housed up to 15.000 people. It was considered to be the third-largest Soviet based in East Germany. Only the complex in Wünsdorf was more significant.
The area changed after the Second World War when it became of strategic importance to the Soviet Forces in Occupied Germany. Construction of the barracks and the military base started in 1952 and, after it was done, it housed up to 15.000 people. It was considered to be the third-largest Soviet based in East Germany. Only the complex in Wünsdorf was more significant.
The area changed after the Second World War when it became of strategic importance to the Soviet Forces in Occupied Germany. Construction of the barracks and the military base started in 1952 and, after it was done, it housed up to 15.000 people. It was considered to be the third-largest Soviet based in East Germany. Only the complex in Wünsdorf was more significant.
Vogelsang used to be more than just a Soviet military base. This place used to be a city filled with secrets and soldiers, but today it lays empty in Brandenburg while it rots away in the middle of a forest.

Historically speaking, one of the most important things that happened in Vogelsang was the fact that, in 1959, the military base was equipped with up to twelve R-5 Pobeda nuclear missiles. This was before the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962, and the rockets here were aimed at military forces in France and Great Britain, among other places.

According to some Soviet documents, the nuclear missiles were removed from Vogelsang in 1959. Still, other records say that they were not moved until much later. Since the military base was hidden from outsiders and covered by forest, it was hard for Western Forces to discover what was really happening in there. But, today, all of this is over.

With the withdrawal of the Soviet and Russian forces in 1994, parts of the military city were demolished. The rest now can be found rotting in the middle of the forest, as you can see in the pictures we took there.

Large parts of the abandoned military base are gradually demolished, and we saw some of it being done in the distance while we walked between buildings. The site is being brought back to nature, and it’s great to see it being done since this is a famous place for its forest and we are glad that it will grow back to what it used to be.

Large parts of the abandoned military base are gradually demolished, and we saw some of it being done in the distance while we walked between buildings. The site is being brought back to nature, and it's great to see it being done since this is a famous place for its forest and we are glad that it will grow back to what it used to be.
Large parts of the abandoned military base are gradually demolished, and we saw some of it being done in the distance while we walked between buildings. The site is being brought back to nature, and it's great to see it being done since this is a famous place for its forest and we are glad that it will grow back to what it used to be.
Large parts of the abandoned military base are gradually demolished, and we saw some of it being done in the distance while we walked between buildings. The site is being brought back to nature, and it's great to see it being done since this is a famous place for its forest and we are glad that it will grow back to what it used to be.
Large parts of the abandoned military base are gradually demolished, and we saw some of it being done in the distance while we walked between buildings. The site is being brought back to nature, and it's great to see it being done since this is a famous place for its forest and we are glad that it will grow back to what it used to be.
Historically, one of the most important things that happened in Vogelsang was the fact that, in 1959, the military base was equipped with up to twelve R-5 Pobeda nuclear missiles. This was before the Cuban Missile Crisis, and the rockets here were aimed at military forces in France and Great Britain, among other places.
Historically, one of the most important things that happened in Vogelsang was the fact that, in 1959, the military base was equipped with up to twelve R-5 Pobeda nuclear missiles. This was before the Cuban Missile Crisis, and the rockets here were aimed at military forces in France and Great Britain, among other places.

As we said in the beginning, we arrived at Vogelsang by train. After a few minutes by bike, we managed to find our way inside the abandoned military complex. We left our bikes hidden in the forest, took our cameras and started looking for some of the gorgeous murals we saw over at the article that Abandoned Berlin had about this place.

It was easy to spot some of them. There was a Lenin mural outside of what we believe used to be a restaurant or cafe. Not far from it, there are more murals with some military references and a soldier that watches over from one of the buildings. Inside the many buildings, you can still find some traces of the Soviet forces that were stationed there.

But the most fantastic mural that we found came to us by accident. We knew that there were some Soviet paintings in a place underground, in a flooded hallway, but we were not sure where was this located. We got lucky when we entered one of the many similar buildings and saw a few massive tires blocking a flight of stairs. We took our flashlights and decided to investigate. And, there it was, a Soviet flag and some soldiers painted into the wall of a flooded hallway in complete darkness. We didn’t manage to take a good picture of it due to the dark, the weird angle we were in and the weirdness of it all but we found it.

Either way, Vogelsang is an exciting place for those who, like us, like to explore abandoned places. We saw a lot of unusual things in there, and we can only hope they are there when you visit it. If you do, don’t destroy anything, don’t take something with you and leave it as it was. Just take pictures and enjoy the fact that you are walking inside a former military base of a country that doesn’t exist anymore. This is a piece of history and should be seen as such.

But the most fantastic mural that we found came to us by accident. We knew that there were some Soviet paintings in a place underground, in a flooded hallway, but we were not sure where was this located. We got lucky when we entered one of the many similar buildings and saw a few massive tires blocking a flight of stairs. We took our flashlights and decided to investigate. And, there it was, a Soviet flag and some soldiers painted into the wall of a flooded hallway in complete darkness. We didn't manage to take a good picture of it due to the dark, the weird angle we were in and the weirdness of it all but we found it.
But the most fantastic mural that we found came to us by accident. We knew that there were some Soviet paintings in a place underground, in a flooded hallway, but we were not sure where was this located. We got lucky when we entered one of the many similar buildings and saw a few massive tires blocking a flight of stairs. We took our flashlights and decided to investigate. And, there it was, a Soviet flag and some soldiers painted into the wall of a flooded hallway in complete darkness. We didn't manage to take a good picture of it due to the dark, the weird angle we were in and the weirdness of it all but we found it.
But the most fantastic mural that we found came to us by accident. We knew that there were some Soviet paintings in a place underground, in a flooded hallway, but we were not sure where was this located. We got lucky when we entered one of the many similar buildings and saw a few massive tires blocking a flight of stairs. We took our flashlights and decided to investigate. And, there it was, a Soviet flag and some soldiers painted into the wall of a flooded hallway in complete darkness. We didn't manage to take a good picture of it due to the dark, the weird angle we were in and the weirdness of it all but we found it.
But the most fantastic mural that we found came to us by accident. We knew that there were some Soviet paintings in a place underground, in a flooded hallway, but we were not sure where was this located. We got lucky when we entered one of the many similar buildings and saw a few massive tires blocking a flight of stairs. We took our flashlights and decided to investigate. And, there it was, a Soviet flag and some soldiers painted into the wall of a flooded hallway in complete darkness. We didn't manage to take a good picture of it due to the dark, the weird angle we were in and the weirdness of it all but we found it.
Historically, one of the most important things that happened in Vogelsang was the fact that, in 1959, the military base was equipped with up to twelve R-5 Pobeda nuclear missiles. This was before the Cuban Missile Crisis, and the rockets here were aimed at military forces in France and Great Britain, among other places.
Historically, one of the most important things that happened in Vogelsang was the fact that, in 1959, the military base was equipped with up to twelve R-5 Pobeda nuclear missiles. This was before the Cuban Missile Crisis, and the rockets here were aimed at military forces in France and Great Britain, among other places.
Vogelsang used to be more than just a Soviet military base. This place used to be a city filled with secrets and soldiers, but today it lays empty in Brandenburg while it rots away in the middle of a forest.
Vogelsang is an exciting place for those who, like us, like to explore abandoned places. We saw a lot of unusual things in there, and we can only hope they are there when you visit it. If you do, don't destroy anything, don't take something with you and leave it as it was. Just take pictures and enjoy the fact that you are walking inside a former military base of a country that doesn't exist anymore. This is a piece of history and should be seen as such.
Vogelsang is an exciting place for those who, like us, like to explore abandoned places. We saw a lot of unusual things in there, and we can only hope they are there when you visit it. If you do, don't destroy anything, don't take something with you and leave it as it was. Just take pictures and enjoy the fact that you are walking inside a former military base of a country that doesn't exist anymore. This is a piece of history and should be seen as such.



How to arrive at Vogelsang

If you want to explore Vogelsang, you should do like we did and leave from Südkreuz on a regional train. We took the RB12 there and stopped at the Vogelsang Bahnhof. From there, you can either cycle to the military complex or walk there. Look at the map below and take your chances.

Vogelsang

Vogelsang: Exploring an Abandoned Soviet Military Base north of Berlin

53.0336°N 13.3908°E

16792 Zehdenick
Germany





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